Good evening. Welcome to the six o’clock news. I’m your anchor…

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(via sokpoppet)

iamdavidbrothers:

People dream of being as good at killing the mood as Yoshihiro Togashi

drunkenhistory:

Daniel Inouye (Steven Yeun) being a badass on Drunk History, S2 Ep7.

(via cwnerd12)

smootymormonhelldream:

Amnesty International just got real.

(via cognitivedissonance)

astrejlau:

HERE’S THE THING ABOUT BOXTROLLS.

After seeing the teaser I REALLY wanted to see it. After seeing the trailer I REALLY didn’t. I thought it would be boring or snotty or idk fake? So then I got invited to go, and OH WOW I AM SO HAPPY I SAW THIS MOVIE. American trailers are always 99% AWFUL because the common person doesn’t know what the hell is good. So, just trust me here.

More important though is from what that first teaser had, and THAT is the real tone of the movie. Personally, I didn’t come from a traditional family structure. I’m fine with it, but every now and then someone would talk about their parents and I’d be “oh. no I don’t understand what you mean.” And it was always slightly distancing even though I love my guardians. But you know, everything I saw growing up pointed to ‘I should feel different.’

This was the first..well, anything? I saw that had the message of ‘family is the people who love you’ WITHOUT BEING PATRONIZING. Also it never felt like that was the point of the movie, it was SO refreshing. Sure stories like this have been told, but for me they never felt…quite right. Boxtrolls wasn’t preachy, it wasn’t the…you know, cheap heartstring plot to make you feel ‘oh look we’re being good people by saying they’re just like us look at us please pat us on the back for making this thanks’ but no it was CELEBRATED and HONEST. I never felt like it was being any less than sincere, and WOW that meant a lot. If I had this movie growing up? I can’t even imagine how much it would have meant to kid me.

I’m so happy this movie exists. I’m so happy that kids who don’t have a traditional mom and dad can see this movie and know that they are perfect and normal and allowed to be happy. PLEASE go see this movie. Support this studio. They are incredible.

donotruninfear:

jennaanne01:

THIS IS IMPORTANT. 

wow.. the fucking story line. speechless. 

(via iamtehzuul)

trnscndnt:

lordoftheswag:

masterofbirds:

in3ffable-lib3rty:

IMPORTANT FERGUSON UPDATE - WATCH THIS VIDEO BEFORE YOUTUBE TAKES IT DOWN

CNN REPORTER Fredricka Whitfield interviews the Store Owner’s Lawyer (from the store that was “”“”“”“robbed”“”“”“”“”“”” by “”“”“”“”“”mike brown”“”“”“”“”“)

As the lawyer begins to explain what really happened, cnn “”“”“loses the feed”“”“”“

WOW

Wtf……

important

(via andaglas)

elwynbrooks:

Here’s the shotguns used tonight. Lots of restraint shown:

Summary of the night (August 18th, 2014):

There were many arrests throughout the night. Water bottles and other objects were thrown at police, and after gunshots rang out near the QuikTrip, police began firing smoke and gas indiscriminately. There have been reports of white anarchist agitators from out of town, provoking police.

Many protesters ran, terrified, coughing. Journalists were caught in the gas: one canister rolled right under a photographer, who collapsed from it. Fires and bricks were used by residents to try and keep back police.

Police began clearing out the street, ordering anyone who wasn’t credentialed media to leave or be faced with arrest. When one reporter (who is livestreaming the events and has a camera on him) explained he lost his credentials while being fired at and showed his PRESS patch instead, officer told him “this doesn’t mean shit” while ripping the journalist’s PRESS patch off of his vest and throwing it to the ground.

Police formed two lines and began moving forward. A handful of protesters got caught between the lines, trapped but repeatedly told to get out. Among them, WaPo reporter Wesley Lowery reports that the entire neighbourhood has barriers and many people are unable to get home.

SWAT teams have begun doing tactical sweeps and media were ordered away.

Amnesty International was also on the ground tonight and were kicked out by police. Currently, AI is highly critical of the US.

There are still a few people trapped, it appears, including a few reporters, who are tweeting that they’re being mercilessly gassed:

And here’s an image of what it looks like when they fire gas:

Currently waiting for a presser from Captain Johnson, who was seen tonight attempting to keep peace with no helmet/mask/gear.

(via ohthestoriesitell)

princemono:

VERIFIED FUNDRAISERS:

aforementioned #operationhelporhush: the starter’s twitterteepsring shop, amazon wishlist, paypal

and Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund

Feed the Students of Ferguson (source: starter’s twitter St. Louis Foodbank Confirmation)

i have been seeing a lot of different links for different places to donate for bail and legal fees, but i haven’t been able to find anything on whether or not the funds have actually been going towards helping out the people of ferguson so

if you know of any more please add and spread them and if in doubt remember to google first

(via iamtehzuul)

werewolfau:

At a deposition, Ferguson’s former police chief revealed that his staff did not keep records of incidents in which officers used force against citizens, so long as no one died; in other words, there was no way of telling how often incidents like Davis’ happened.

remember shit like this when they talk about how mike brown’s shooter had no disciplinary record

(via sassymeenah)

jerkidiot:

in one of The Giver trailers, the narrator literally says “In a world where love is forbidden, they will fight to bring it back.” like okay that’s not what the book is about at all

(via lascocks)

thisiswhiteprivilege:

softboycollective:

TUESDAY 8/19: Ferguson PD presented a table full of fabricated evidence at this morning’s press conference - allegedly seized from protestors and stopped cars. The Colt 45 Molotov with a white bandana was the crowning glory, turns out you can’t even buy glass 40’s in Missouri. Stay classy, FPD

I seriously think white supremacist are coming in the area to frame the protesters, but it could just be the cops

(via tastyturtles)

atane:

thisiseverydayracism:

What white St. Louis thinks about Ferguson

By Julia Ioffe | New Republic

About a 15-minute drive from the Ferguson protest that, by now, feels more like a block party, in the more upscale St. Louis suburb of Olivette, there’s a new strip mall with a barbecue joint and a Starbucks and an e-cigarette store. On a mild Thursday evening in August, people sat around tables, sipping coffee, sipping beer, dabbing barbecue sauce off their fingers.

All of these people were white.

It was a stark contrast to Ferguson, which is two-thirds black. Olivette is almost the exact opposite, at over 60 percent white. St. Louis, and the little hamlets that ring it, is one of the most segregated cities in America, and it shows.

Here in Olivette, the people I spoke to showed little sympathy for Michael Brown, or the protesters.

"It’s bullshit," said one woman, who declined to give her name. When I asked her to clarify what, specifically, was bullshit, she said, "All of it. I don’t even know what they’re fighting for."

"It’s just a lot of misplaced anger," said one teenage boy, echoing his parents. He wasn’t sure where the anger should be, just that there should be no anger at all, and definitely no stealing.

"Our opinion," said the talkative one in a group of six women in their sixties sitting outside the Starbucks, "is the media should just stay out of it because they’re riling themselves up even more."

"The protesters like seeing themselves on TV," her friend added.

"It’s just a small group of people making trouble," said another.

"The kid wasn’t really innocent," chimed in a woman at the other end of the table (they all declined to give their names). "He was struggling with the cop, and he’s got a rap sheet already, so he’s not that innocent." (While the first point is in dispute, the second isn’t: The police have said that Michael Brown had no criminal record.)

If anything, the people here were disdainful and, mostly, scared—of the protesters, and, implicitly, of black people.

"I don’t think it’s about justice for Michael Brown’s family," said the teenage boy. "It’s just an excuse for people to do whatever they want to do."

One man I talked to, a stay-at-home dad who is a landlord to three black tenants and one white one in Ferguson (“my black tenants would never do that,” he clarified) was more sympathetic to Brown and also had the sense that the police had overdone it a bit. But he was scared of the protests. I told him that the protest that day was entirely peaceful, festive almost. “You know,” he said. “I have a wife and three children, and if something were to happen to me, that would be very bad.”

As for the protests, well, they weren’t about justice; they were just an excuse. “People are just taking the opportunity to satisfy their desire for junk,” said one woman, knowingly. As if black people, the lust for theft encoded in their DNA, are just barely kept in line by authority.

"When they kill each other, we never hear about it," one of the Starbucks women said. This, she meant, was a good thing. "When it’s black-on-black violence, we never hear about it."

I asked why she thought that was.

"Because, basically, they hate whites!" her friend chimed in. "Prejudice, reverse prejudice. Prejudice goes both ways."

The others signalled their agreement.

"It’s not Ferguson people. It’s a lot of outside people coming in."

This was a sore subject with several of the people I spoke to. A major problem with the protests—and they very clearly did not mean the militarized police response to the protests—was that they were tarnishing St. Louis’s image as a nice place.

"I’m embarrassed to say I’m from St. Louis," the "bullshit" woman grumbled.

"Me, too," said her friend. "I don’t tell people I’m from St. Louis anymore."

"This is not representative of St. Louis," said one of the older women, back at Starbucks. "St. Louis is a good place. And Ferguson is a very good place."

"We have never had anything like this in St. Louis!" her friend exclaimed, flustered, as if trying to clear the city’s good name. "Ever!"

As the women grew uncomfortable, one of them hit on a way to fight back.

"Where are you from?" she asked me.

"Washington," I said.

"Well," she said, satisfied. "You people have trouble too sometimes."

And they all laughed.

Source: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119102/what-white-st-louis-thinks-about-ferguson

"Not all white people"…

(via think4yourself)